University of Florida

UF Research Highlights

University of Florida contributes exciting and innovative research to the plant community throughout the world. Keep up to date with what solutions are being provided for the Green Industry and Master Gardeners.

Selected New and Updated EDIS Documents

EDIS is the Electronic Data Information Source of UF/IFAS Extension.

EP515 Olives for Your Florida Landscape
Olives have great potential as a landscape ornamental and may also provide opportunities for home fruit production. However, as a relatively new commercial crop to Florida, the cultural requirements of these trees are not completely known and research is ongoing to understand how to manage them for plant health and fruit yield as well as to make recommendations on varietal selections best suited to the southeastern region of the United States. This 5-page fact sheet includes culture and management information, selected references, and a table listing a selection of olive cultivars currently available in the U.S. Written by Mack Thetford, Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman, Michael J. Mulvaney, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2015.

AG392 Lemon Bacopa: Bacopa caroliniana
Lemon bacopa is a native aquatic and wetland plant that is a welcome inclusion in a variety of settings, including water gardens, aquatic ponds, and wetland restoration and mitigation sites. The species is broadly adapted and extremely common throughout Florida, and its perennial nature assures a stellar performance year after year. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Lyn Gettys and Carl J. Della Torre III, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, April 2015.

PP317 Rose Rosette Disease: A New Disease of Roses in Florida
Rose rosette disease is an incurable, destructive disease that affects both wild and cultivated roses. Over the past several decades, the disease has spread over much of the U.S., though it was first observed in Florida in 2013. This 6-page fact sheet describes the symptoms and diagnosis of the disease, as well as the cultural, chemical, and, possibly, biological controls that can minimize its spread. Written by Binoy Babu, Mathews L. Paret, Tim Schubert, Carlye Baker, Gary Knox, Fanny Iriarte, James Aldrich, Laura Ritchie, Carrie L. Harmon, and Svetlana Y. Folimonova, and published by the UF Department of Plant Pathology, May 2015.

Previously featured articles

New Cultivar Releases

UF has the largest academic contingency of plant breeders in the US. Our scientists develop varieties that are more Florida-friendly, heat tolerant, and easier to grow. Recent releases include:

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